Here’s a Winner for you:

Singular-Meaning Lexicon and Handbook of the Greek New Testament

And I love the description:

Singular-Meaning Lexicon and Handbook of the Greek New Testament is divided into two distinct sections. The Lexicon first gives a singular meaning for every NT Greek word. Next, the meaning is discovered by analysis of every occurrence of that word in the NT. Meanings are sifted until a singular meaning is found that adapts in every location of that word. This would be as near as a human could get to the meaning that was in the one mind of God, who is the author. The Handbook includes a treatment on the rare subject of the scriptural history of language. The Grammar section is an attempt to adapt the NT Greek grammar so that it is consistent. Issues like the passive meaning given to the middle voice, imperatival force put on the participial verb forms etc. are discussed.

About the Author

Richard Averitt was an instructor at Carver Bible Institute and College in Atlanta, Georgia. He has a Bachelor of Arts degree with a Greek major, a Master’s degree in Biblical Literature and additional hours of graduate work including Hebrew. A lifetime student of the Greek and Hebrew Bible. He is a widower, blessed with three wonderful children. For his music book the author has been a lifetime flautist, a Craftsman Member of the Piano Technician’s Guild and has directed church choirs. The family is all musically inclined, still using their talents in teaching and partaking in church music.

There’s a review on Amazon. Its a good review, but what scares me is that there were two people who didn’t think it was helpful.

Oh and you can peruse some of the contents on Google Books too.

17 thoughts on “Here’s a Winner for you:

  1. I look at it and think that the description is not accurate. It says that it sifts through the various uses of the words for its various applications. In reality, what I have seen is that it lists the Greek word, lists how many times it is used, but doesn’t place the other uses in context, so it doesn’t actually appear to be sifting anything. Maybe I am not reading the description right.

    Also, words have multiple meanings, so they can’t simply be reduced into one single meaning. Context must dictate how the word should be understood. If I read the description correctly, it is saying that the book attempts to boil the Greek words into single meanings that can apply in every context. If my understanding of the book is correct, I would have to say the book would not be helpful in this regard.

    I think it is nice that it has an extensive lexicon attached with a grammar, which alone is worth the cost of the book.

    What do you think?

  2. “If I read the description correctly, it is saying that the book attempts to boil the Greek words into single meanings that can apply in every context. If my understanding of the book is correct, I would have to say the book would not be helpful in this regard.”

    That’s exactly why I pointed to it. As the Amazon review says, its falicious and displays no understanding of how language functions.

  3. Ok, then what I misunderstood was your last statement in the post.

    When you said that you were scared over the fact that there were two people who stated that “it” wasn’t helpful, I thought you were referring to the book and not the book review. I see what you mean now.

    Sorry for the misunderstanding.

  4. What’s the boiled down meaning of Winner?

    Oh, right, the book’s about Bible Greek in which John’s translation of John the Dipper’s exclamation upon seeing his cousin means one thing: that Jesus was either woolly or white (which singularly suggests that he hadn’t shaved for days, Jesus that is).

    What do you get when you boil down ὁ ἀμνὸς? a baaaad dinner or a sheepishly sheered translation.

    (Sorry to use modifying words here like adjectives and appositives and adverbs and such, and plurals too).

  5. (and to use hyperbole and sarcasm too. So sorry. and to make two comments also. I’m in need of some ἀφίημι (is that forgiveness, as in the Lord’s prayer of Mt 6:12; some alone time, which is what the devil gives Jesus in Mt 4:11, or willingness to just drop the matter, which is what Joshua demands of Yohann the Baptist in Mt 3:15?)

  6. Such an approach seems to deny the fact of semantic domains which can allow for various meanings and uses. I would dismiss it out of hand for that reason alone.

  7. I thought it was hard to have a book published by a publisher of scholarly books.
    I understood how it was possible to find a publisher for a book like this after I “googled” the publisher.

  8. I see what you mean about the publisher. This is basically a self-published book. At one time I actually thought about self-publishing, but after further reflection I discarded the idea though that didn’t stop Trafford from continuing to pursue my inquiry. Thank goodness I changed my e-mail address.

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