Language & Linguistics

This page contains links to book reviews that focus on language and linguistics.

Book Review: Articular Infinitives in the Greek of the New Testament
• Saturday, 26 Sept, 2009

Book Review: The Basics of Verbal Aspect Part I
• Saturday, 8 Nov, 2008

Book Review: The Basics of Verbal Aspect Part II
• Saturday, 8 Nov, 2008

Book Review: A Grammatical and Exegetical Study of Verbs of Transference: A Case Frame Approach and Lexicon by Paul Danove Part I
• Thursday, January 21, 2010

Book Review: A Grammatical and Exegetical Study of Verbs of Transference: A Case Frame Approach and Lexicon by Paul Danove Part II
• Saturday, February 20, 2010

Book Review: How Biblical Languages Work by Peter Silzer & Thomas Finley
• Saturday, 21st June, 2008

Book Review: Koine Greek Reader
• Tuesday, 30th Dec, 2008

Book Review: The Noun Phrase in Ancient Greek–Part I
• Wednesday, 13th Oct, 2010

Book Review: The Noun Phrase in Ancient Greek–Part II
• Wednesday, 15th Oct, 2010

Book Review: A Reader’s Greek New Testament, 2nd Edition
• Sunday, 12th Oct, 2008

Book Review: Two Volumes on Greek Prepositions
• Tuesday, 12th July, 2012

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4 thoughts on “Language & Linguistics

  1. In your blog with Runge, you mention that you intended to go through Living Koine. What is your opinion on it?

    1. Hi Mike,
      I wonder if you would be up for and have time for serving me as I continue to consider lexicography. Would you be up for scanning a few pages of GELS for me? It is purely for research.
      If you’re inclined, let me know.

      Here’s what I’m really after. What were the sources most heavily used for the occurrences of words. That is, given that componential (semantic) analysis is best based upon actual occurences of words, where did GELS get his samples of word usage from. You provided one scan of an entry from GELS on your comparison review. There, there appeared to be one reference to Inscriptions, but not other occurrences outside of the LXX. I know JF Hobbins referred to a quote from Herodotus, so that’s something. But I also think your comments hinted that GELS’s source base was not very broad. I would be very interested in empirical ways to discover this.

      May I ask where in the world you are, on a side note?
      Bye,
      Solomon (bobwiley22@yahoo.com)-

      1. Is there a particular reason you decided to leave this comment here? It isn’t particularly relevant.

        In any case, I don’t really have time to do what you’re asking. I’d recommend going to a library and if the library has it, scan the pages yourself and if it doesn’t have it, requesting it through interlibrary loan or something like that. If you did that, then you’re be able to look at GELS’ list of sources and bibliography yourself. In either case, both BDAG and LSJ are more useful for variety of citation and sources anyway, so I’d probably just suggest using them.

        But if all you’re interested is in the occurrrences of words, just go to Perseus under Philologic and search for the words yourself. Granted, I have no idea why in the world you’d want to do componential analysis at all–what a terrible methodology.

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